Performance Details

Department of Education and Early Development

Mission

To ensure quality standards-based instruction to improve academic achievement for all students. Alaska Constitution Article 7, Sec. 1; AS 14.17

Core Services

  • Distribute Public School Funding to school districts and other educational institutions
  • Provide Fiscal Accountabiliity, Compliance and Oversight
  • Develop, implement and maintain School Effectiveness Programs
  • Maintain Active Partnerships for Pre-K through 20 and lifelong learning

Arrow GraphicResults

Core Services
A: Department Result  Details >
A1: Distribute Public School Funding to school districts and other educational institutions  Details >
  • TARGET #1: Distribute Public School Funding according to legislative appropriations based on formula calculations
  • TARGET #2: Calculate and distribute state entitlement funding based on the Base Student Allocation and formula calculations per AS 14.17.
A2: Provide Fiscal Accountabiliity, Compliance and Oversight  Details >
  • TARGET #1: Provide efficient fiscal accountability, compliance and oversight for the Department of Education and Early Development's operating and capital budgets and programs
  • TARGET #2: Limit the number of state and federal audit findings
A3: Develop, implement and maintain School Effectiveness Programs  Details >
  • TARGET #1: Increase the numbers and percent of high school graduates qualifying for the Alaska Performance Scholarship (APS).
  • TARGET #2: Assist school districts to improve the statewide graduation rate
  • TARGET #3: Increase the teacher retention rate through the Alaska Statewide Mentor Program
  • TARGET #4: Provide a Statewide System of Support to facilitate school effectiveness measures
  • TARGET #5: Provide support to school districts for Early Learning programs to assist communities, parents and caregivers in preparing children for school
  • TARGET #6: Facilitate the Work Ready / College Ready curriculum and the WorkKeys assessment program
A4: Maintain Active Partnerships for Pre-K through 20 and lifelong learning  Details >
  • TARGET #1: By 2020, growth to equal the national average of Alaska high school graduates continuing on to postsecondary education within twelve months of graduation
  • TARGET #2: Continue to support the Alaska Native Science and Engineering Program with the University of Alaska
  • TARGET #3: Collaborate and coordinate with public and private entities for educational purposes

Performance Detail


A: Result - Department Result

A1: Core Service - Distribute Public School Funding to school districts and other educational institutions
    
Target #1: Distribute Public School Funding according to legislative appropriations based on formula calculations

Methodology: Foundation and Pupil T includes the Foundation Program and Pupil Transportation
ACYA = Alaska Challenge Youth Academy
Totals are from the Alaska Budget System (ABS) Authorized scenario.
Amounts are displayed in the thousands.
Amounts include funding as appropriated outside the formula.


Distribution of Public School Funding
Fiscal Year Foundation & Pupil T Boarding Home Grants Youth in Detention Special Schools ACYA Total Distribution
FY 2014
$1,293,505.0
$3,749.5
$1,100.0
$3,691.7
$4,791.4
$1,306,837.6
FY 2013
$1,237,557.9
$3,728.8
$1,100.0
$3,314.7
$4,958.4
$1,250,659.8
FY 2012
$1,190,646.9
$3,330.8
$1,100.0
$3,318.4
$5,826.8
$1,204,222.9
FY 2011
$1,150,477.6
$1,690.8
$1,100.0
$3,303.0
$5,826.8
$1,162,098.2
FY 2010
$1,094,450.0
$1,690.8
$1,100.0
$3,127.5
$6,429.1
$1,106,797.4
FY 2009
$1,038,383.8
$1,340.8
$1,100.0
$3,132.8
$6,243.9
$1,050,201.3
FY 2008
$1,041,818.5
$1,340.8
$1,100.0
$3,156.0
$5,709.0
$1,053,124.3
FY 2007
$1,045,155.4
$1,440.8
$1,100.0
$3,173.7
$5,449.3
$1,056,319.2

Analysis of results and challenges: Effective January 1, 2014 the Alaska Challenge Youth Academy will be transferred to the Department of Military and Veterans Affairs and will no longer be a budgeted component within the Department of Education and Early Development.

Public school funding distributions to school districts, the state boarding school and centralized correspondence study are expended out of the Public Education Fund (AS 14.17.300). The amounts reflected above include funding appropriated within the formula and outside the formula.
OUTSIDE THE FORMULA APPROPRIATIONS
FY2014: Ch14, SLA2013, HB65 (Operating Budget); Ch16, SLA2013, SB18 (Capital Budget)
FY2013: Ch17, SLA2012, SB160 (Capital Budget)
FY2012: Ch3, SLA2011, HB108 (Operating Budget)
FY2008: Ch30, SLA2007, SB53 (Capital Budget); Ch28, SLA2007, HB95 (Operating Budget); Ch29, SLA2008, SB221 (Capital Budget)
FY2007: Ch33, SLA2006, HB365 (Operating Budget) / CH41, SLA2006, HB13 - fiscal note#7

AS 14.17.300 Public Education Fund (a) The public education fund is established. The fund consists of appropriations for
(1) distribution to school districts, to the state boarding school, and for centralized correspondence study under this chapter; and
(2) transportation of pupils under AS 14.09.010.
(b) Money appropriated to the fund may be expended without further appropriation. Money appropriated to the fund does not lapse. The money in the fund may be expended only in aid of public schools and for centralized correspondence study programs under this chapter and for transportation of pupils under AS 14.09.010. Interest earned on money held in the fund before expenditure may be appropriated to the fund by the legislature.
    
Target #2: Calculate and distribute state entitlement funding based on the Base Student Allocation and formula calculations per AS 14.17.


Analysis of results and challenges: The annual Base Student Allocation amount can only be adjusted by an enacted statute change. The Department of Education and Early Development distributes Public School Funding to 53 school districts and Mt. Edgecumbe High School, the state boarding school.

A2: Core Service - Provide Fiscal Accountabiliity, Compliance and Oversight
    
Target #1: Provide efficient fiscal accountability, compliance and oversight for the Department of Education and Early Development's operating and capital budgets and programs

Methodology: The Total GF is displayed in the thousands.
Includes General Funds only.
Includes the following components:
Executive Administration (except FY09 & FY10 SoSS funding), Administrative Services, Information Services, School Finance and Facilities, Student and School Achievement (except general funds that apply to other Core Services: AMEREF, ANSEP, GF/MH, Iditarod Theme-based Learning, curriculum mapping, K-3 & statwide literacy, WorkKeys, TVEP), Teacher Certification, Child Nutrition and State Facilities Rent.


General Fund Cost of Fiscal Accountability, Compliance and Oversight Per ADM
Fiscal Year Total GF ADM Cost / ADM
FY 2014
$16,548.9
129,332.80
+0.35%
$127.97
FY 2013
$15,996.8
128,885.85
0%
$123.99
FY 2012
$14,738.0
128,885.84
-0.12%
$114.35
FY 2011
$14,156.6
129,046.71
-0.14%
$109.70
FY 2010
$13,774.3
129,228.67
+0.66%
$106.59
FY 2009
$12,906.0
128,380.75
-0.46%
$100.53
FY 2008
$10,360.8
128,975.24
-0.91%
$80.33
FY 2007
$11,852.3
130,164.21
$91.06

Analysis of results and challenges: The change from FY2007 to FY2008 reflects reductions based on department efficiencies. There was also a decrease in the FY2008 ADM count. Increases from FY2008 - FY2012 are results of salary and health insurance bargaining unit adjustments.
    
Target #2: Limit the number of state and federal audit findings


Analysis of results and challenges: For each fiscal year, the Division of Legislative Audit conducts an audit of the State of Alaska’s basic financial statements and the State’s compliance with federal laws and regulations in the administration of federal financial assistance programs. The audit is conducted in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America, Government Auditing Standards issued by the Comptroller General of the United States, and complies with the federal Single Audit Act Amendments of 1996 and the related OMB Circular A-133 issued by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget.

Findings occur when non-compliance has been discovered during the audit process. An audit finding can be related to an individual program or multiple programs and are categorized by the degree of deficiency in the internal controls of an organization. A material weakness is a deficiency or combination of deficiencies in internal controls, such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of an entity’s financial statements will not be prevented or detected and corrected in a timely basis. A significant deficiency, or a combination of deficiencies, in internal controls is less severe than a material weakness yet important enough to merit attention by those charged with governance.

During the FY2012 Statewide Single Audit, the Division of Legislative Audit selected ten federal programs that the Department of Education & Early Development administers to audit for compliance with accounting standards and applicable federal compliance standards as outlined in OMB Circular A-133. As a result of the audit, the department was issued two findings that affected four of the ten federal programs audited. The two findings were concerned with compliance with federal guidelines and were significant deficiencies.

The following federal programs were audited as part of the FY2012 Statewide Single Audit:

CFDA / Program Name / Finding
10.558 / Child & Adult Care Food Program / X
84.027 / Special Education – Grants to States / X
84.173 / Special Education – Preschool Grants / X
84.367 / Improving Teacher Quality State Grants / X
84.377 / School Improvement Grants
84.388 / School Improvement Grants ARRA
84.391 / Special Education Grants to States ARRA
84.392 / Special Education Preschool Grants ARRA
84.394 / State Fiscal Stabilization Funds ARRA
84.410 / Education Jobs Fund

FY2013 data will be available when the audit is complete. The final audit report is due to the Legislative Budget and Audit Committee by March 31, 2014.

A3: Core Service - Develop, implement and maintain School Effectiveness Programs
    
Target #1: Increase the numbers and percent of high school graduates qualifying for the Alaska Performance Scholarship (APS).


Analysis of results and challenges: Preliminary Fall 2013 data show that the high school graduating class of 2013, the third cohort of graduates since the APS was launched, had the highest percent of APS-eligible grads in the program's brief history. This is particularly notable given that the rigorous high school standards have been phased in over the multi-year period. Detailed information about program outcomes is available in ACPE's annual APS Outcomes Reports, which can be found online at http://acpe.alaska.gov/DATA-REPORTS/Reports.

Related links:
   • Alaska Performance Scholarship


    
Target #2: Assist school districts to improve the statewide graduation rate

Methodology: The 2013 data is preliminary only, and won't be final and published until the State Report Card is released in January 2014.

The Graduation Rate methodology changed beginning with the 2010-2011 school year. Based on a federal mandate, all 50 states must report a graduation rate using the Four Year Adjusted Cohort Graduation Rate Method.


Analysis of results and challenges: The preliminary 2013 rate is 71.6% (7,115 graduates of 9,931 cohort members).

Under the Four Year Adjusted Cohort Graduation Rate method, a Cohort Year is assigned each first time 9th grade student with the expectation that the student will graduate within four years. For instance, a student who entered 9th grade in the 2009-2010 school year would be considered part of the 2013 Cohort. A student may be added to the cohort via a transfer into the public school system or removed from the cohort upon death or upon transfer to an education program with a secondary school diploma track. A Cohort is comprised of all students active within a specific Cohort Year.

A graduate is defined as a student who has received a regular diploma from a state or district approved education program as evidenced by receipt of a secondary school diploma from school authorities. Any student who receives a diploma under a waiver from the competency examination required under AS 14.03.075(a), as specified by the State Board of Education, is considered a graduate. This does not include a student who receives a certificate of achievement or a GED certificate.

The calculation of the Statewide Graduation Rate complies with current federal regulations.

Note: The inverse of the graduation rate is not the dropout rate.
    
Target #3: Increase the teacher retention rate through the Alaska Statewide Mentor Program

Methodology: Data reflects Alaska Statewide Mentor Project activity for the school year; i.e. 2006 refers to the 2005 - 2006 school year.
2013 Urban Year 2 teachers have a sample size of 3


Analysis of results and challenges: The goals of the Alaska Statewide Mentor Program (ASMP) are to increase teacher retention and improve student achievement through quality mentoring to first- and second-year teachers new to the profession (called early career teachers).

Mentors are experienced Alaska teachers who receive formal training in 8, 3-day Mentor Academy sessions held over two years. Academies focus on how to support the accelerated growth of early career teachers’ classroom practice. Mentors communicate with the early career teachers on a weekly basis with monthly in-class visits.

Average retention rates for teachers served by ASMP are shown in the chart based on location of district (rural, urban) and years of teaching experience (first, second). Overall, ASMP-mentored teachers average a year-to-year retention rate of 80% from 2004-2005 through 2011-2013. Research has also shown promising results of closing the student achievement gap between early career teachers and veteran teachers through ASMP mentoring.

Project numbers since inception have remained consistent, serving on average about 380 early career teachers (ECTs) a year. In the beginning years of the project about 75% of the ECTs served by ASMP were from rural districts with the remaining 25% from the top five largest urban districts in the state. Due to funding changes in the Fall of 2011, ASMP served primarily rural districts (97% of ECTs) in academic year 2011–2012 (AY12) and then an increased amount of urban teachers again in AY13 (80% rural, 20% urban). Overall, ASMP has served over 2,100 individual ECTs through training 108 experienced Alaska teachers as high-quality mentors through AY13.

Over 8 years, ASMP has been invited into 52 of the 54 school districts within the state to serve their early career teachers. Nearly 70% of all schools (345 by the end of AY12) have been served by the project at least one year.

In FY2012, this program was reduced by $750,000 in general funds, which was $1,350,000 less than the Governor’s budget. In FY2013 this program was reduced by an additional $150,000 in general funds from the Governor’s budget. The total authorization removed over the two year period equals $1,500,000 with $900,000 being general funds which previously supported this effective program.

Related links:
   • Alaska Statewide Mentorship Project
   • Division of Teaching and Learning Support
   • Department of Education & Early Development


    
Target #4: Provide a Statewide System of Support to facilitate school effectiveness measures

Methodology: FY2012 inclues Spring session only, which was the first.
FY2013 includes both the Spring and Fall sessions.
FY2014 inlcudes Fall session only. Spring data will not be available until June 2014.

Effective in the Fall of 2013, the training is now called the "Teaching and Learning Support Institute" (TLSI).

If a district participated in both the Fall and Spring sessions, they are only counted once under "No. of Districts". The sum of all participants that attended both the Fall and Spring sessions is what is reported under "No. of Participants".


Analysis of results and challenges: In FY2012 and FY2013 the Department of Education & Early Development (EED) sponsored Curriculum & Alignment Institutes (CAI) which are two-day events designed to assist and support districts in building awareness of the new English Language Arts and Mathematics standards, aligning curriculum and instructional materials, and begin the instructional shifts that will best facilitate the transition process. Considering the scope of changes happening across the landscape of public education in Alaska the Curriculum & Alignment Institute has been reframed to reflect that multifaceted work. In September 2013 EED sponsored the Teaching and Learning Support Institute (TLSI) in which educators were given the opportunity to continue the work on the transition of materials and instruction to the new standards, build an understanding of the Alaska School Performance Index and the Educator Evaluation regulations. As indicated by the graph, the number of attendees at (TLSI) increased considerably from previous similar events (CAI) while the number of districts increased but not as significantly. This would indicate that districts continuing to value the support offered and are bringing larger number of participants to join in the work. The challenge remains to provide relevant assistance and support for the varied levels of need throughout the state.
    
Target #5: Provide support to school districts for Early Learning programs to assist communities, parents and caregivers in preparing children for school

Methodology: Pre-Kindergarten years represent the following:
Fall 2009
Spring 2010
Spring 2011
Spring 2012
Fall 2013 - Information will be updated after Spring 2014 results.
FY2014 - Data will be available in the Fall of 2014.


Analysis of results and challenges: Pre-Kindergarten:
Alaska Pre-K Four Year Comparisons: FY2010 - FY2013
Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale-Revised Edition (ECERS-R)

The ECERS-R is designed for use in classroom-based early childhood care and education programs serving children aged two to six years. It is organized into six scales: Space and Furnishings; Personal Care Routines; Language-Reasoning; Activities; Interaction; and Program Structure. Each scale has additional subscales, with multiple items that must be passed to receive a given score. Each subscale is scored on a seven point scale, with benchmarks established for 1 = Inadequate, 3 = Minimal, 5 = Good, and 7 = Excellent. Programs that pass some of the items that are part of the benchmark for a 3, but not all of them, are scored a 2 on that subscale. Similarly programs that fall between good and excellent are scored a 6.

Each program site varied in their strengths and areas of improvement, but there were some trends common across all of the programs. While all continuing programs showed improvement through the Pre-Kindergarten program, some showed dips or fall back in some areas reflecting the specific changes seen at each particular assessment. FY2013 began a new grant cycle with over half of the classrooms rated on the ECERS being new to the Alaska Pre-Kindergarten program. These new classrooms set base line scores in a range between above minimal (3) to approaching excellent (7).
    
Target #6: Facilitate the Work Ready / College Ready curriculum and the WorkKeys assessment program

Methodology: Graph displays total number of CRCs issued
CRC = College Readiness Certificate
WR/CR = Work Ready/College Ready


Career Readiness Certificates Issued
Year CRCs Issued to Students # of WR/CR Schools # of all 3 Tests Compltd
2013
7,096
-2.22%
243
-3.57%
8,506
-0.78%
2012
7,257
-1.68%
252
-1.56%
8,573
+1.14%
2011
7,381
+483.94%
256
+1606.67%
8,476
+493.56%
2010
1,264
+106.87%
15
-6.25%
1,428
+80.08%
2009
611
+225%
16
+128.57%
793
+207.36%
2008
188
7
258

Analysis of results and challenges: The 2012-2013 school year was the third year that all grade 11 students were required by regulation to participate in the WorkKeys assessment.

The three WorkKeys tests given to students are: Applied Math, Locating Information and Reading for Information. Completion of all three tests with a minimum score of WorkKeys Level 3 is required to earn a National Career Readiness Certificate.

The Department of Education & Early Development (EED) is working continuously to address implementation challenges including technology, student and staff scheduling concerns, as well as providing comprehensive training to teachers and school counselors. EED continues to build partnerships with businesses, industries, and postsecondary providers to ensure the certificates are meaningful and useful to students, and assist them in educational and workforce achievement.

Students can qualify for the Alaska Performance Scholarship (APS) by using WorkKeys scores. The Career and Technical Education (CTE) APS can be used for attendance in a CTE certification program, but not for an associate’s or other degree program in Alaska. To be eligible for the CTE APS a student must receive a combined WorkKeys score of 13 or above, with no score below four for each of the three tests required for the National Career Readiness Certificate. A CTE APS qualifying student must also meet the minimum curriculum and grade point average (GPA) requirements that are required for the academic APS.

Related links:
   • Alaska Career Ready (inside EED network)
   • Alaska Career Ready (outside EED netowork)
   • Department of Education & Early Development



A4: Core Service - Maintain Active Partnerships for Pre-K through 20 and lifelong learning
    
Target #1: By 2020, growth to equal the national average of Alaska high school graduates continuing on to postsecondary education within twelve months of graduation


Analysis of results and challenges: The most recent report from the National Center on Statistices was published in May 2013.

Alaska's postsecondary education participation rates are of significant concern. Alaska's students' enrollment in college the Fall following graduation is reported by the National Student Clearinghouse at 53% compared to national data reflecting a rate of 68%, placing the state at the lowest performance level for this measure.

ACPE's mission is to provide Alaska's students, parents, and teachers/mentors with the information and financial aid resources necessary to access, and successfully complete higher education. ACPE mission-related services include 1) outreach to increase public awareness of the importance of postsecondary education and training and the critical steps leading to success, 2) statewide programs that incent students to aspire to education beyond high school that leads to a well-paying career in the Alaska workforce, 3) financial aid programs for Alaska students pursuing higher education, and 4) building Alaska's statewide longitudinal data capacity to facilitate analysis of the return on investment of public funds appropriated for educational programs and services.

The desired end results from these strategies are more than an increase in the numbers; they are development of a trained, competitive Alaska citizenry who are well-prepared to take the place of a graying workforce and leverage a strong economy through attracting business and industry investment in Alaska.

By primarily targeting programs and services to elementary and secondary students, ACPE intends to provide families with the information they need to successfully plan for career and college.
    
Target #2: Continue to support the Alaska Native Science and Engineering Program with the University of Alaska

Methodology: Information provided by the University of Alaska.

Analysis of results and challenges: Since inception in 1995, the Alaska Native Science and Engineering Program (ANSEP) has evolved into a longitudinal education model that provides a continuous string of components that begins with students in sixth grade and continues on through high school, into undergraduate degree programs, and through graduate school to earn PhDs. ANSEP inspires students to complete the preparatory science and math coursework necessary for success in BS degree programs in science and engineering at the University of Alaska. The focus at each level is to provide excitement and empowerment around these careers. ANSEP’s objective is to effect systemic change in the hiring patterns of Alaska Natives in science and engineering by placing students on a career path to leadership.

By successfully completing ANSEP components, every student in Alaska can become eligible for the Alaska Performance Scholarship regardless of where they live. ANSEP works with students from 95 communities.

ANSEP University Success: There are 527 Alaska Native students enrolled in science and engineering BS degree programs at University of Alaska campuses. Twenty-three Alaska natives earned BS degrees in science and engineering in May 2013. There have been 304 Natives awarded BS degrees in science and engineering since 2002. There are 28 Alaska Native students enrolled in MS and PhD programs in science and engineering, and four Alaska Natives graduated with advanced degrees in May 2013. All ANSEP graduates have successfully transitioned to careers in the science or engineering professions.

ANSEP Summer Bridge: Summer Bridge is a fast paced, challenging experience with the opportunity to earn scholarship support and build networking opportunities for future internships for recent high school graduates. There have been 307 participants in the summer bridge program since its inception in 1998. Since 2010, 99 students completed the Summer Bridge component and of those participants, Ninety percent of the participants continued on to engineering or science B.S. degree programs. During Summer 2013 there were 27 Sumer Bridge students

ANSEP Acceleration Academy: For a high school student, the benefits of having direct access to a college environment, university faculty, and an encouraging peer group are invaluable. The program begin in 2010. Ninety-five percent of the High School students benefit by advancing in one level or more in math or science each summer. In summer 2013, 60 students participated in the 5 week, residential, summer academy at the University of Alaska Anchorage

ANSEP Middle School Academy: Since 2010, rising 6th, 7th, and 8th grade students have attended this two week, residential, science and engineering experience. Eighty percent of the ANSEP Middle School Academy students graduate 8th grade in a math level of Algebra 1 or higher. During summer 2013 there were 162 Middle School Academy students.

Analysis provided by the University of Alaska.
    
Target #3: Collaborate and coordinate with public and private entities for educational purposes

Methodology: Amounts are reported in the thousands.
Total Department Active Partnerships includes:
LAM - Libraries, Archives, Museums
ASCA - Alaska State Council on the Arts
PTPC - Professional Teaching Practices Commission
ACPE - Alaska Commission on Postsecondary Education (includes WWAMI)
TLS - Partnerships within the Teaching & Learning Support division (AMEREF,TVEP, GF/MH, MHTAAR, SDPR, I/A, ANSEP, Best Beginnings, Parents as Teachers, Online with Libraries, Live Homework Help, Alaska Learning Network)
MEHS - Mt. Edgecumbe High School (includes State Facilities Maintenance)


Department of Education and Early Development Active Partnerships
Fiscal Year LAM ASCA PTPC ACPE TLS MEHS
FY 2014
$12,706.3
$1,912.3
$299.7
$23,535.2
$6,768.1
$11,937.2
FY 2013
$12,574.4
$1,820.7
$295.8
$22,031.5
$5,569.0
$11,525.7
FY 2012
$14,366.2
$1,798.0
$290.0
$21,019.6
$4,066.0
$11,443.5
FY 2011
$9,060.6
$1,691.8
$282.3
$17,072.9
$3,680.8
$10,455.9
FY 2010
$8,842.7
$1,895.3
$275.0
$15,759.9
$2,060.5
$8,505.5
FY 2009
$8,656.6
$1,532.8
$267.7
$14,802.6
$1,660.2
$8,576.9
FY 2008
$8,251.3
$1,465.2
$254.7
$13,428.9
$1,382.0
$8,009.4
FY 2007
$8,193.6
$1,335.6
$251.9
$13,404.5
$1,332.7
$7,848.3

Analysis of results and challenges: FY2011: The Student & School Achievement component received general fund base funding for the partnership with the University of Alaska for the Alaska Native Science and Engineering Program (ANSEP).

FY2012: The Library Operations component received federal and statutory designated program receipt authorization for the ARRA Broadband Technologies Opportunities Program.
The Alaska Commission on Postsecondary Education (ACPE) received general fund base funding for the AlaskAdvantage Education Grant program and federal receipt authorization for the College Access Challenge Grant program.

FY2013: The Student & School Achievement component received general funds for Best Beginnings, Parents as Teachers, year three of three of the Iditarod theme-based learning project, and one-time funds for a grant to the North Slope Borough School District for curriculum alignment, integration and mapping.

In FY2014, three new components were created under TLS: Online With Libraries, Live Homework Help and Alaska Learning Network; ASCA received additional SDPR authorization for Rasmuson Foundation grants; MEHS received an increase to support Dormitory Management Services; ACPE received an increase in Interagency Receipts authorization for the Longitudinal Data System project.

 

Current as of August 27, 2014