Performance Details

Department of Health and Social Services - Juvenile Justice

Mission

To hold juvenile offenders accountable for their behavior, promote the safety and restoration of victims and communities, and assist offenders and their families in developing skills to prevent crime.

Core Services

  • Juvenile Probation Services
  • Juvenile Detention Services
  • Juvenile Treatment Services

Arrow GraphicMission Results

Core Services
A: RDU Result  Details >
A1: Juvenile Probation Services  Details >
  • TARGET #1: Reduce the rate of recidivism for juveniles released from Division of Juvenile Justice Probation
  • TARGET #2: Determine cost per day for Probation Services based on average daily population
A2: Juvenile Detention Services  Details >
  • TARGET #1: Reduce the rate of recidivism for juvenile released from Division of Juvenile Justice detention
  • TARGET #2: Determine annual cost of services per occupied detention bed-day
A3: Juvenile Treatment Services  Details >
  • TARGET #1: Reduce the rate of recidivism for juveniles released from Division of Juvenile Justice institutional treatment
  • TARGET #2: Determine the annual cost of services per occupied treatment bed-day

Performance Detail


A: Result - RDU Result

A1: Core Service - Juvenile Probation Services
    
Target #1: Reduce the rate of recidivism for juveniles released from Division of Juvenile Justice Probation


Recidivism Rate for Juveniles Released from DJJ Probation
Fiscal Year YTD Total
FY 2014
45.5%
FY 2013
43.0%
FY 2012
40.7%
FY 2011
42.1%
FY 2010
42.8%

Analysis of results and challenges: This measure examines reoffense rates for juveniles who received probation supervision while either remaining at home or in a nonsecure custodial placement. These youths typically have committed less serious offenses and have demonstrated less chronic criminal behavior than youth who have been committed to a juvenile treatment facility. (Recidivism rates for treatment facility youth are analyzed in a separate performance measure, below. The two groups are considered separately because of the distinctively different levels of risk and need presented, and the different types of interventions and programming received.)

Research has identified the factors that result in delinquent behavior. These are a history of offenses and involvement in the juvenile justice system, and challenges in these life areas: family circumstances/parenting; education/employment; peer relations; substance abuse; leisure/recreation; personality/behavior; and attitudes/orientation. The division has embarked on a number of efforts to improve our understanding of these factors and to reduce the risks and needs that result in juvenile recidivism.

Note: For juveniles to be counted as recidivists in the data above, adjudication and conviction information on offenses that were committed 24 months after release from probation supervision must have been entered in the divisionís Juvenile Offender Management Information System or the Alaska Public Safety Information Network by July 3, 2014. The analysis also excludes youth who were ordered to an Alaskan juvenile treatment facility any time prior to their supervision end date, as these youth are included in the analysis for our juvenile treatment facilities, below. Non-criminal motor vehicle, Fish & Game, tobacco, and alcohol violations are not counted as re-offenses. Adjudications and convictions received outside Alaska also are excluded from this analysis.

    
Target #2: Determine cost per day for Probation Services based on average daily population


Cost per Day for Probation Services Based on Average Daily Population
Fiscal Year YTD Total
FY 2014
$40.91
FY 2013
$33.91
FY 2012
$33.43

A2: Core Service - Juvenile Detention Services
    
Target #1: Reduce the rate of recidivism for juvenile released from Division of Juvenile Justice detention


Rate of Recidivism for Juveniles Released from DJJ Detention
Fiscal Year YTD Total
FY 2014
59.9%
FY 2013
63.1%
FY 2012
60.8%
FY 2011
57.1%
FY 2010
53.3%

Analysis of results and challenges: In FY2014, 192 juveniles were released from secure detention facilities; of these, 115 (59.9%) returned for a subsequent admission to detention within two years. This recidivism rate is consistent with that seen for previous years.
Analysis: ďDetention recidivismĒ is a new measure for the Division of Juvenile Justice, developed to help examine the likelihood that a juvenile will return to secure detention once having been released. Instead of following up to determine whether youth had committed new offenses upon release from detention, the division determines whether they have been returned to secure detention. Lower rates of return to detention will indicate that the division has been successful in developing alternatives for these youth and in using its secure detention facilities more efficiently.

Note: Only youth 16 years of age or younger in the fiscal year under study are included in this analysis because older youth would have aged out of the juvenile system before the two-year follow-up period ended.

    
Target #2: Determine annual cost of services per occupied detention bed-day


Annual Cost of Services per Occupied Detention Bed-Day
Fiscal Year YTD Total
FY 2014
$592.00
FY 2013
$673.40
FY 2012
$539.67

A3: Core Service - Juvenile Treatment Services
    
Target #1: Reduce the rate of recidivism for juveniles released from Division of Juvenile Justice institutional treatment


Rate of Recidivism for Juveniles Releasted from DJJ Institutional Treatment
Fiscal Year YTD Total
FY 2014
60.2%
FY 2013
59.1%
FY 2012
71.1%
FY 2011
62.5%
FY 2010
61.1%

Analysis of results and challenges: This measure examines recidivism for youth who have been committed to and released from the divisionís four juvenile treatment facilities. These youth typically have the most intensive needs among juvenile offenders, and have been institutionalized because they demonstrated particularly violent behavior or failed to meet requirements of probation supervision or less-restrictive placements.

The definition for recidivism in this measure has been developed to align with an emerging national definition. This effort is being led by the national Council of Juvenile Correctional Administrators and is intended to enable better state-by-state comparisons of recidivism rates and ultimately lead to improved strategies to reduce reoffending by juveniles. Data is not yet available from the council on how recidivism rates under the new definitions compare across states. Moreover, Alaska releases such a small number of juveniles from treatment facilities each year that is it difficult to be certain whether changes over time represent actual trends. Nevertheless, the data from Alaska do demonstrate that the division must continue to focus particular attention on effective strategies for Alaska Native youth. These youth are disproportionately represented both among the total number of institutionalized youth and those who reoffend following treatment. The division has launched several initiatives that are anticipated to result in improved outcomes in future years.

Note: For juveniles to be counted as recidivists in the data above, adjudication and conviction information on offenses that were committed 24 months after release from a treatment facility must have been entered in the divisionís Juvenile Offender Management Information System or the Alaska Public Safety Information Network by July 3, 2014. Non-criminal motor vehicle, Fish & Game, tobacco, and alcohol violations are not counted as re-offenses. Adjudications and convictions received outside Alaska also are excluded from this analysis.

    
Target #2: Determine the annual cost of services per occupied treatment bed-day


Annual Cost of Services per Occupied Treatment Bed-Day
Fiscal Year YTD Total
FY 2014
$650.72
FY 2013
$597.48
FY 2012
$560.51

 

Current as of October 29, 2014