Performance Details

Department of Labor and Workforce Development

Mission

The mission of the Department of Labor and Workforce Development is to provide safe and legal working conditions and to advance opportunities for employment. AS 23.05.010

Core Services

  • Protect Workers: Eliminate accidental injuries, fatalities, and occupational illnesses within the departmental jurisdiction.
  • Workforce Development: Prepare Alaskans for Alaska's jobs.
  • Income Replacement: Eligible Alaskans receive timely and accurate income replacement determinations and payments.

Arrow GraphicResults

Core Services
A: Department Result  Details >
A1: Protect Workers: Eliminate accidental injuries, fatalities, and occupational illnesses within the departmental jurisdiction.  Details >
  • TARGET #1: Bring employers suspected of illegally operating without workers' compensation insurance coverage into compliance with the Workersí Compensation Act.
  • TARGET #2: A three percent reduction in the five-year moving average rate of workplace fatalities per 100,000 employees.
  • TARGET #3: A two percent per year reduction in the rate of workplace lost time injuries and illnesses per 100 employees.
A2: Workforce Development: Prepare Alaskans for Alaska's jobs.  Details >
  • TARGET #1: At least 95 percent of Workforce Investment Act (WIA) and State Training and Employment Program (STEP) training completers enter employment.
  • TARGET #2: At least 80 percent of Alaska Vocational Technical Center students in long-term programs (longer than six weeks) graduate.
  • TARGET #3: At least 90 percent of Alaska Vocational Technical Center long-term graduates are employed in their area of training.
  • TARGET #4: Increase the percentage of Alaska Labor Exchange System registrants that enter employment by one percent as compared to the previous year.
  • TARGET #5: Equal prior year's number of employed individuals exiting the Vocational Rehabilitation program.
  • TARGET #6: Increase employment of the Alaska resident workforce by 0.5 percent per year.
  • TARGET #7: Decrease the percent of non-residents working in Alaska by two percent per year.
A3: Income Replacement: Eligible Alaskans receive timely and accurate income replacement determinations and payments.  Details >
  • TARGET #1: Exceed the federal timeliness benchmark of 87 percent of initial Unemployment Insurance payments within 21 days.
  • TARGET #2: Requests for reimbursement from the Fishermen's Fund will be paid within 30 days of receipt.

Performance Detail


A: Result - Department Result

A1: Core Service - Protect Workers: Eliminate accidental injuries, fatalities, and occupational illnesses within the departmental jurisdiction.
    
Target #1: Bring employers suspected of illegally operating without workers' compensation insurance coverage into compliance with the Workersí Compensation Act.

Methodology: The fraud investigation section conducts investigations, brings actions against uninsured employers before the Workers' Compensation Board, and presents evidence and testimony which can lead to stop orders, fines, and criminal prosecution through the Department of Law. An additional fraud investigator approved in the FY2009 budget contributed to a significant increase in the number of employers brought into compliance on an annual basis.

Number of Employers Brought into Compliance with Workers' Compensation Act
Fiscal Year YTD Total
FY 2014
280
FY 2013
360
FY 2012
387
FY 2011
319
FY 2010
348
FY 2009
326
FY 2008
153
FY 2007
126
FY 2006
146
FY 2005
141
FY 2004
158
FY 2003
189
FY 2002
129

Analysis of results and challenges: During FY2014, SIU estimates it brought 280 employers into compliance. This is a difficult number to quantify, as many of the compliance checks conducted result in proof of coverage found (e.g., there was a delay in policy reporting that was fixed either prior to or subsequent to assignment of investigator). The remaining employers are brought into compliance either prior to or subsequent to petition and/or hearing.
    
Target #2: A three percent reduction in the five-year moving average rate of workplace fatalities per 100,000 employees.

Methodology: The workplace fatality rate per 100,000 employees is calculated by dividing the number of workplace fatalities during the year by the average number of workers employed and then multiplying the result by 100,000. This statistic is calculated using workplace fatality reports submitted to the Alaska Occupational Safety and Health section and employment statistics maintained by the department's Labor Market Information section.

Five-Year Average Rate of Workplace Fatalities per 100,000 Employees (Achieved the three percent reduction target in FY2014)
Fiscal Year Yearly Rate 5-year Average 5-yr Avg % Change
FY 2014
0.89
-25.83%
1.51
-9.04%
-9.0%
FY 2013
1.20
+31.87%
1.66
+12.16%
12.1%
FY 2012
.91
-66.79%
1.48
-8.07%
-8.1%
FY 2011
2.74
+44.21%
1.61
+10.27%
+10.3%
FY 2010
1.9
+22.58%
1.46
+8.96%
+9%
FY 2009
1.55
+400%
1.34
+30.1%
+30%
FY 2008
.31
-80.38%
1.03
-21.37%
-21%
FY 2007
1.58
-18.56%
1.31
+3.15%
+3%
FY 2006
1.94
+46.97%
1.27
-11.19%
-11%
FY 2005
1.32
0%
1.43
-23.53%
-23%
FY 2004
0
1.87
-20%

Analysis of results and challenges: This statistic is calculated using workplace fatality reports submitted to the Alaska Occupational Safety and Health (AKOSH) section and employment statistics maintained by the department's Labor Market Information section. AKOSH will continue to work to reduce workplace fatalities through a combination of consultation and enforcement activities targeted on eliminating the most prevalent causes of fatalities in industries with high fatality rates.

Related links:
   • Workplace Fatality Statistics
   • http://labor.alaska.gov/research/injfatal/fatal.htm


    
Target #3: A two percent per year reduction in the rate of workplace lost time injuries and illnesses per 100 employees.

Methodology: Prior to FY2011 this rate was calculated as of September 30, but this delayed budget performance reporting until November. To eliminate this delay, as of FY2011, rates are calculated for the state fiscal year as of June 30.

Workplace Lost Time Injuries and Illnesses Rate Per 100 Employees (exceeded the two percent reduction target in FY2014)
Fiscal Year Rate % Change
FY 2014
.61
-46.02%
-46%
FY 2013
1.13
-16.3%
-16%
FY 2012
1.35
+8%
7.0%
FY 2011
1.25
-6.02%
-6%
FY 2010
1.33
-6.34%
-6%
FY 2009
1.42
-16.96%
-17%
FY 2008
1.71
-15.35%
-15%
FY 2007
2.02
-9.82%
-10%
FY 2006
2.24
-2.18%
-2%
FY 2005
2.29
+18.04%
18%
FY 2004
1.94
-28.94%
-29%
FY 2003
2.73
-15.74%
-16%
FY 2002
3.24
-9.75%
-10%
FY 2001
3.59


Analysis of results and challenges: Since FY2001, the Alaska Occupational Safety and Health program has reduced the lost workday illness and injury rate by 52 percent by targeting consultation and enforcement efforts on the causes of illnesses and injuries in industries with high incident rates. Since FY2009, the lost time illnesses and injuries rate has remained relatively stable. In FY2009, the program initiated a five year strategic plan which focused inspection, and training and consultation efforts on high growth, high hazard industries (construction, transportation/warehousing and seafood processing) as evidenced by Worker's Compensation Insurance claims data.

In 2014 Worker's Compensation changed their database and now has the capacity to reflect more accurate information about the submitted claims using different claim type categorization and processing procedures.

Related links:
   • OSHA Jurisdiction



A2: Core Service - Workforce Development: Prepare Alaskans for Alaska's jobs.
    
Target #1: At least 95 percent of Workforce Investment Act (WIA) and State Training and Employment Program (STEP) training completers enter employment.

Methodology: This information was gathered from the division's new case management system. The system operated for the state fiscal year 2013. That said, the measure only includes participants where two quarters transpire after that participant completes their training. Thus only participants from the first half of the year are included in this measure.

Percent of Workforce Investment Act and State Training and Employment Program Training Completers Employed (performance shifted due to a change in data definitions plus implementation of a new system in FY2013)
Fiscal Year Entered Employment Rate Target
FY 2013
80.0%
95%
FY 2012
93.3%
95%
FY 2011
93.6%
95%
FY 2010
93.9%
95%
FY 2009
95.9%
95%
FY 2008
94.0%
95%
FY 2007
95.2%
95%
FY 2006
96.0%
95%
FY 2005
92.0%
95%

Analysis of results and challenges: This measure indicates the ratio of participants that enter the workforce within two quarters of being trained. It indicates both the demand of industry for the individuals trained and the success of that training. The FY2013 entered employment rate decreased in part due to the introduction of a new data collection system. This system went live July 1st of 2012, and the data set did not include the productive early months (May and June).
    
Target #2: At least 80 percent of Alaska Vocational Technical Center students in long-term programs (longer than six weeks) graduate.

Methodology: Data for each student is maintained in a student database system.

Percent of AVTEC Long-Term Program Students Who Graduate (exceeded the target of 80 percent in FY2014)
Fiscal Year COE Benchmark AVTEC
FY 2014
0%
88%
FY 2013
60%
86%
FY 2012
70%
85%
FY 2011
60%
89%
FY 2010
60%
83%
FY 2009
72%
85%
FY 2008
70%
83%
FY 2007
70%
83%
FY 2006
72%
85%
FY 2005
72%
81%
FY 2004
68%
80%
FY 2003
70%
80%
FY 2002
67%
77%
FY 2001
76%
80%

Analysis of results and challenges: The Council on Occupational Education (COE) has nationally accredited Alaska Vocational Technical Center (AVTEC) since 1997. The COE benchmark for measuring "students that complete long-term training programs" is established as the national average of more than 400 similar public post-secondary institutions. For each year from FY1999 to FY2013, AVTEC has consistently met or exceeded the COE benchmark. The COE benchmark for FY2014 will be published in December 2014.

In FY2014, of the 453 students enrolled, 61 students are still in training and 345 students graduated, yielding a graduation rate of 88 percent.
    
Target #3: At least 90 percent of Alaska Vocational Technical Center long-term graduates are employed in their area of training.

Methodology: The AVTEC Placement Officer maintains contact with long-term graduate for one year following graduation to gather employment information. This is reported to the Council on Occupational Education, which is the national accrediting agency for AVTEC.

Percent of AVTEC Long-Term Program Graduates Employed in Their Area of Training (exceeded the target of 90 percent in FY2012.
Fiscal Year COE Benchmark AVTEC
FY 2012
68%
92%
FY 2011
70%
85%
FY 2010
70%
90%
FY 2009
79%
85%
FY 2008
80%
90%
FY 2007
83%
90%
FY 2006
83%
92%
FY 2005
88%
93%
FY 2004
87%
94%
FY 2003
86%
92%
FY 2002
86%
94%
FY 2001
86%
90%

Analysis of results and challenges: The Council on Occupational Education (COE) has nationally accredited Alaska Vocational Technical Center (AVTEC) since 1997. The COE benchmark for measuring "graduates of long-term programs employed in their area of training" is established as the national average of more than 400 similar public post-secondary institutions. For each year from FY1999 to FY2012, with the exception of FY2009, AVTEC consistently met or exceeded the COE benchmark. The COE benchmark for 2013 will be published in December 2014.

In FY2012, of 291 graduates eligible for employment, 261 (92 percent) were employed in their area of training.

Alaska Vocational Technical Center's (AVTEC) percentage of long-term graduates employed in their area of training has been at or above the 90 percent target since FY2010 with the exception of FY2009. In FY2009 & FY2011 the average was 85 percent while in FY2012 the average was 92 percent. Placement data for FY2013 will be available in December 2014.

AVTEC only tracks long-term (longer than six weeks) program graduates for this measure. Graduates are followed for one year for employment data collection purposes. The AVTEC Placement Officer is currently in the process of collecting 2013 graduate placement data.

    
Target #4: Increase the percentage of Alaska Labor Exchange System registrants that enter employment by one percent as compared to the previous year.

Methodology: Entered Employment is defined as the number of participants who demonstrated employment (wages earned) in the first quarter after the quarter that they exit participation. Exiting participation is defined as not receiving services for 90 days.
Source: Alaska Labor Exchange System (ALEXsys) and Labor Production System


Percent of Alaska Labor Exchange System Registrants that Enter Employment (exceeded the target increase of one percent in FY2013)
Fiscal Year 1st Qtr 2nd Qtr 3rd Qtr 4th Qtr YTD Total Change
FY 2013
52%
52%
53%
54%
53%
+3%
FY 2012
50%
50%
50%
50%
50%
-1%
FY 2011
51%
51%
50%
50%
51%
-1%
FY 2010
54%
52%
51%
50%
52%
-5%
FY 2009
57%
57%
57%
56%
57%
+1%
FY 2008
56%
55%
56%
56%
56%
-2%
FY 2007
60%
59%
57%
56%
58%
-4%

Analysis of results and challenges: The increase of individuals who entered employment may be attributable to an increase in job openings. This is an indicator that Alaska's economy is improving.

    
Target #5: Equal prior year's number of employed individuals exiting the Vocational Rehabilitation program.

Methodology: The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Management Information System.

Vocational Rehabilitation Program Participants Employed (did not achieve the target of maintaining prior year performance)
Fiscal Year YTD Total
FY 2013
598
FY 2012
637
FY 2011
569
FY 2010
548
FY 2009
529

Analysis of results and challenges: An individual must be working for a minimum of 90 days in order to be counted as employed when exiting the vocational rehabilitation program. The number of individuals exiting DVR employed decreased by 6% from FY2012 to FY2013. Overall, DVR experienced a decrease in demand for services.

Related links:
   • Vocational Rehabilitation


    
Target #6: Increase employment of the Alaska resident workforce by 0.5 percent per year.

Methodology: Alaska residency is determined by matching the Alaska Department of Revenue Permanent Fund Dividend (PFD) file with the Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development wage file. The PFD file is a list of Alaskans who either applied for or received a PFD. The wage file contains quarterly earnings and industry information on workers covered by unemployment insurance within Alaska. Source: Nonresidents Working in Alaska 2011 (Published January 2013)

Resident Workers in Alaska (exceeded the target increase of 0.5 percent in 2011. 2012 data will be available Jan 2014)
Year Resident Workers % Change Nonresident Workers % Change Nonres Wkrs - % Total
2011
331,081
+0.75%
0.8%
83,488
+4.55%
4.6%
20.1%
2010
328,611
+0.88%
0.9%
79,856
+3.89%
3.9%
19.6%
2009
325,752
-0.54%
-0.5%
76,867
-3.46%
-3.5%
19.1%
2008
327,532
+1.48%
1.5%
79,618
+1.21%
1.2%
19.6%
2007
322,758
+1.51%
1.5%
78,669
-0.22%
-0.2%
19.6%
2006
317,968
+0.94%
0.9%
78,840
+6.16%
6.2%
19.9%
2005
315,003
+0.74%
0.7%
74,266
+5.54%
5.5%
19.1%
2004
312,686
+1.04%
1.0%
70,367
+3.02%
3.0%
18.4%
2003
309,468
+0.96%
1.0%
68,305
+0.49%
0.5%
18.1%
2002
306,521
+1.54%
1.5%
67,972
+0.01%
0.0%
18.2%
2001
301,881
+1.34%
1.3%
67,963
+4.58%
4.6%
18.4%
2000
297,885
+1.36%
1.4%
64,988
+0.25%
0.3%
17.9%
1999
293,901
+2.51%
2.5%
64,828
-6.79%
6.8%
18.1%
1998
286,707
---
69,551
---
19.5%

Analysis of results and challenges: The number of Alaska resident workers increased by 0.8 percent from 328,611 in calendar year 2010 to 331,081 in 2011, surpassing the target increase of 0.5 percent. This reflects a continuing improving economy since 2009 when the stateís overall employment decreased for the first time since 1997. The 2012 resident worker numbers will be available in January 2014.

Alaskaís economy continues to grow. This leads to increases in the number of both resident and nonresident workers. One of the departmentís highest priorities is to provide the information and training programs that prepare the stateís resident workforce to get the maximum benefit from the stateís economic growth. To that end, the department is committed to improving the content and marketing of its training programs and producing sound occupational forecasts to help identify unmet training needs. The department will also work with industry to assess their needs, coordinate training programs, and enforce resident-hire laws and regulations. Nonresident worker information for 2012 will be published in January 2014.

    
Target #7: Decrease the percent of non-residents working in Alaska by two percent per year.

Methodology: Permanent fund dividend data is compared to employee wage records and other Alaska employment data to develop the information.


Percent of Nonresident Workers in Alaska (did not achieve the target of decreasing the percent of nonresident workers in 2011. 2012 data will be available Jan 2014)
Year % Non-resident
2011
20.1%
2010
19.6%
2009
19.1%
2008
19.6%
2007
19.6%
2006
19.9%
2005
19.1%
2004
18.4%
2003
18.1%
2002
18.3%
2001
18.4%
2000
17.9%
1999
18.1%

Analysis of results and challenges: The nonresident hire rate increased 2.1 percent from 19.6 percent in calendar year 2010 to 20.1 percent in 2011. An improving state economy increases the demand for workers, some of which are nonresident. The nonresident hire rate has averaged 19.6 percent since 2005. Nonresident numbers for 2012 will be available in January 2014.

There were 414,569 wage and salary workers in Alaska in 2011. Of those, 83,488 (20.1 percent) were nonresident. Historically, the highest percentages of private sector nonresident workers were found in manufacturing (mainly seafood processing), scenic and sightseeing transportation, and accommodations. Maximizing resident hire continues to be a high priority of the department. Industries and occupations with high percentages of nonresident workers have been given high priority for new training dollars. Other efforts designed to increase resident hire include industry education and regulatory enforcement. Nonresident information for 2012 will be available in January 2014.

A3: Core Service - Income Replacement: Eligible Alaskans receive timely and accurate income replacement determinations and payments.
    
Target #1: Exceed the federal timeliness benchmark of 87 percent of initial Unemployment Insurance payments within 21 days.

Methodology: U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administrations state performance database

Percent of Initial Unemployment Insurance Payments Processed within 21 Days (exceeded the target of 87 percent in 2013)
Fiscal Year 1st Qtr 2nd Qtr 3rd Qtr 4th Qtr YTD Total
FFY 2013
92.3%
91.1%
0
0
91.7%
FFY 2012
93.1%
91.7%
88.7%
92.4%
91.5%
FFY 2011
92.1%
92.0%
91.9%
93.9%
92.5%
FFY 2010
97.3%
96.3%
94.3%
96.6%
96.1%
FFY 2009
96.4%
95.1%
97.5%
97.1%
96.5%
FFY 2008
94.0%
93.0%
90.7%
93.4%
92.8%
FFY 2007
94.0%
93.9%
93.5%
95.2%
94.2%
FFY 2006
98.1%
92.3%
92.4%
94.1%
93.1%

Analysis of results and challenges: In 2006, 2nd quarter, the federal timeliness benchmark changed to 87 percent of initial payments made within 21 days from 95 percent of initial payments within 35 days. The data reported since 2nd quarter 2006 reflect this change. Data from prior years is available but is not comparable due to the federal measure change.

Although Alaska's performance for Federal FY2012 and Federal FY2013 was lower than in Federal FY2011, it is still well above the national benchmark.

In Federal FY2012, the total number of people receiving an unemployment insurance payment for at least one week was 56,155. In Federal FY2013, the total number of people receiving an unemployment insurance payment for at least one week was 62,536.
    
Target #2: Requests for reimbursement from the Fishermen's Fund will be paid within 30 days of receipt.


Average Number of Days to Process a Fishermen's Fund Claim (achieved the target of 60 days in FY2014)
Fiscal Year # of days # of claims paid
FY 2014
47
371
FY 2013
60
333
FY 2012
69
373
FY 2011
50
447
FY 2010
76
629
FY 2009
38
698
FY 2008
33
705
FY 2007
34
686
FY 2006
41
781
FY 2005
56
807
FY 2004
46
814
FY 2003
38
696
FY 2002
42
810

Analysis of results and challenges: Established in 1951, The Fishermenís Fund provides for the treatment and care of Alaska licensed commercial fishermen who have been injured while fishing on shore, off shore or within Alaskan waters, under the authority of AS 23.35.070, 8 AAC 55.010, and 8 AAC 55.015.

The Fishermenís Fund (Fund) administration may approve qualifying benefits up to $10,000. The Fishermenís Fund Advisory and Appeals Council (Council) makes the determination on all applications for benefits that exceed the fund statutory limit of $10,000, duration of care that exceeds beyond one year from the date of initial treatment, and reviews all claims denied by the Fund.

In FY2014, the number of claims processed by the Fund totaled 546 of which 311 claims were approved (277 by fund administration and 34 by Council). For the year, there were 371 payments issued by the Fund on the 311 approved claims. The Fund approved 202 claims within the same date of receipt, which represents an approval rate of 72% on completed, qualifying claims up to Fund limit of $10,000. The Fund denied 25 claims and 152 claims were closed due to no response to the Fundís request for additional information.

In FY2013, the number of claims processed by the Fund totaled 578 of which 276 claims were approved (249 by the Fund and 27 by Council). For the year, there were 333 payments issued by the Fund on the 276 approved claims. Target changed from 30 days to 60 days. The Fund approved 168 claims within the same date of receipt, which represents an approval rate of 67% on completed, qualifying claims up to Fund limit of $10,000. The Fund denied 52 claims and 266 claims were closed due to no response to the Fundís request for additional information.

In FY2010, the Fishermenís Fund benefit limit was raised from $2,500 to $10,000 by the legislature. The new limit change also spurred changes to new claim requirements and documentation that fishermen must submit to the Fund to process new claims.

While the fund has not seen a substantial change in the number of claims processed, there has been a substantial increase in claims placed in closed status (a claim is closed when there is no response to the Fundís request for additional information to process and make a determination of eligibility). The Fund has made efforts to increase contact with the fisherman at 30 and 60 days to ensure claims are processed in a timely fashion.

Claims filed by fishermen are cyclical with the fishing season. The Fund receives 50% of its total claim inventory for every fiscal year within 4 months, from July through October. A majority of claims are turned in after the fisherman is done with the season. Many fishermen return home after being away for 60 to 90 days and then seek treatment. One out of three claims is submitted by a non-resident. Claim payments may be delayed for the following reasons:
1. Receipt of a bill from a provider with no corresponding claim filed by fisherman.
2. Claim received from fisherman without required explanation of benefits from provider.
3. No response to an inquiry about items presented on an application.

 

Current as of August 26, 2014